Definitions

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A bill passed by both the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and Senate.

A change to a bill or law that can occur from the time a bill is introduced to its final passage.

Authorization to spend state funds

Consisting of two houses (House and Senate)

Inclusive of both political parties or supported by both Democrats and Republicans.

A document that is drafted to establish new or amend existing laws.

Meeting of legislators of one political party. Or a group of legislators who meet because of specific issues (ex., Rural Caucus).

Every Committee in the House and the Senate has a Majority and Minority Chair. The Majority Chair is from the party with more members; the Minority Chair is from the party with fewer members.

There are two chambers in the legislature: the House of Representatives and the Senate.

A bill must be “considered” by the Chamber three times before it can potentially be passed to the Governor for signature.

Legislators who have signed on in support of a bill from a Prime Sponsor.

A document that plainly describes the intent of the bill and invites legislators to sign-on in support of the bill, as “co-sponsors.”

A bill does not make it out of Committee and will not be considered by the larger Chamber. If it “dies in Committee,” it did not get enough member support.

Outlines the financial impact of the legislation

The 12-month period during which a budget is in effect.

Bill goes to the full Chamber — either House or Senate — for consideration. If the Chamber’s leadership and members support the bill, it will be “considered” on the Floor before coming for a vote.

Pennsylvania’s legislative body of elected officials that consider and make laws.

Pennsylvania’s legislative body of elected officials that make up the lower house consisting of 203 members

If legislators do not support a bill, they “kill it” by voting against it, and by asking colleagues to join them. A bill can be “killed,” in Committee or on the Floor.

The end result of the introduction of a bill. A bill becomes law after passage in both the House and Senate and approval by the governor.

An individual voted into elected office that serves in the state or federal level. Pennsylvania legislators include Representatives, who serve in the House of Representatives and Senators, who serve in the State Senate.

The Pennsylvania State Legislature (or General Assembly) is a legislative body that makes laws that govern Pennsylvania.

The political party having the most seats in the House of Representatives and Senate.

The political party having the least seats in the House of Representatives and Senate.

The process done in Committee, including putting a bill on the agenda for Committee consideration and voting.

A bill passed by both the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and Senate.

A proposal to change the original terms of a bill

Favorable action on a measure before the legislature

Head of the Senate

Legislator who is leading the bill. The prime sponsor introduces the bill to the Chamber and has their name appear first on a bill.

Pennsylvania’s legislative body of elected officials that make up the upper house consisting of 50 members.

Head of the House of Representatives

Focus on specific issues and serve as the General Assembly’s legislative workshop. Both House and Senate have committees.

When a bill is “laid on the table” it may be considered on a later date. When it is “removed from the table” it may be placed on the Chamber calendar.

Formal disapproval of a measure by the governor.

The schedule that shows which bills are being considered by Chambers’ and whether the bills are on first, second, or third consideration.